CambridgePPF responds to the proposal from the North Barton Road Landowners Group for a major new development between the University’s West Cambridge site and Barton Road

28th Jan 2016

CambridgePPF responds to the proposal from the North Barton Road Landowners Group for a major new development between the University’s West Cambridge site and Barton Road

“CambridgePPF strongly opposes the plans for the development of the West Fields. Indeed, it has rejected the offer from the Colleges to join them in presenting a much bigger scheme that would extend the whole way to the M11. The charity’s forefathers purchased the land to the West of Cambridge as a barrier to urban spread and the current Trustees remain committed to this vision.

This section of the Green Belt is of the highest importance for protecting the setting of the historic core of the city and the approaches to the city from the West. The City and South Cambridgeshire Councils have recently commissioned a new independent review of the inner boundary of the Green Belt, and the charity supports its assessment of the high value of the Green Belt in this area. Building on this area would be totally inappropriate.

The idea proposed by the Colleges of expanding the Coton Countryside Reserve to create a West Cambridge Country Park straddling both sides of the M11 is clearly attractive, but it could never compensate for the harm that would be done to the city if development of the West Fields was allowed. The site is not included in the Councils’ proposed Local Plans and should therefore be rejected.

CambridgePPF appreciates the urgent need for more housing, especially affordable social housing. However, we believe that the provision of 33,500 new homes proposed by the City and South Cambridgeshire Councils is sufficient to meet the foreseeable needs of the Greater Cambridge area without the necessity of building on such a sensitive site as the West Fields.”

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